At the Tardis Tavern™ Patio

In Search Of Banner ©2015-16 Jack BoardmanPREVIOUSLY: They arrived just as Boomer and Linda finished unloading their equipment and were returning to the car, “How-do folks, we’re your next door neighbors—I’m Gina and this is my sister Barb.”

“Yah,” Linda replied, “Good to meetcha, dontcha know. We’re da Carbunkles—from da Raynch where dere ain’t no chobs in da mines and we heard dere was chobs here. So we come here and da mister, Jack, got a chob sellin’ cars and I’m Linda and dey hired me to keep da books.”

Gina bought their story—nobody could be that, well, accurate—pretending to be rustic.

Lakeview City Story—In Search Of—Episode 4… They chatted for another five minutes or so, before Gina and Barb excused themselves so they could meet their husbands for dinner downtown. Both of our heroes were relieved—particularly Linda, who wasn’t sure she could continue to speak “Raynch” much longer without bursting-out laughing.

MEANWHILE—Several days earlier at the Tardis Tavern™ Patio… Chris and Sarah found themselves alone—compelled to remain there by a message left by Cujo. After several long minutes, Chris was becoming a little impatient, “Where are you, Cujo?”

Chris and Sarah found themselves alone ©2015-16 Jack Boardman“Where are you Cujo?”

“I am sorry,” Cujo apologized as she materialized, completely—as evident by the fact she was casting a shadow, “I’ve been tracking Lacy’s life after her, yet again, successful escape from capture in 1873 O’Rourke’s Drift.”

REALLY?” Chris was, as you might imagine, excited by this news, “Where did you find her?”

“Ultimately, May 15, 1879 St. Joseph, Missouri—on her wedding day,” Cujo began her story, “Where she married James William Shouse—a prominent banker in St. Joseph.”

“Gee,” Sarah chimed-in, “That’s where your name came from—a prominent banker—how interesting—a woman who made her living robbing banks married a banker.”

“Ironic, huh,” Chris grinned, “If I am Lacy—I done good!”

“Yes you did,” Cujo’s tail a-wag, “Anyway, in December 1879, they had a son, Dalton James Shouse—and in 1880, a daughter, Christine Marie Shouse.”

“Is she—me?”

“Probably not,” Cujo replied, “Until relatively recently, brides more often than not took their husband’s surname, and certainly in the 1880s it was most unlikely that she would have kept her surname.”

“Do you know what happened to Christine Dalton?” Sarah asked.

“Yes, she died in 1875 of natural causes—she was 79 when she died.”

“What happened to them?” Chris asked.

“James and Lacy Dalton Shouse and their children moved to Great Bend, Kansas in 1882, where James opened a bank,” Cujo replied, “After learning that, I had to leave in time to bring the time-travelers back. This where we are going.”

“By ‘we,’ does that include me?” Sarah asked.

“It does, Jay and the girls are going on a father-daughter outing at my expense—er help, to learn about their Cooper heritage, with your blessing, Sarah. Chris needs your company on this quest.”

“So you don’t know what happened to Dalton James?”

“That will be your job—good luck!

To be CONTINUED…

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About Jack Boardman

Just a little bit of a Curmudgeon.
This entry was posted in Danger Bay Stories, Lakeview City Story—In Search Of, Season 12 and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to At the Tardis Tavern™ Patio

  1. sgtmajcarl says:

    “Gee,” Sarah chimed-in, “That’s where your name came from—a prominent banker—how interesting—a woman who made her living robbing banks married a banker.”

    Oh, the IRONY! 😀

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Chris Shouse says:

    Oh my parallel lives!! Gotta love it!! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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